WORKING YOUR OWN FLOW WITH FUJIFILM X SERIES – PART II

In recent weeks I have been writing a series of blogs for the Fuji X Aus site. It has been an amazing and eye opening experience to talk with members of the Fuji X Aus community and discuss with them their skills, insights, processes and move all else, how they utilise the Fujifilm X Series in their photographic journey. I have been able to address some key questions in these blogs to date and as a result have been able to provide a reference for other photographers to learn from on the Fuji X Aus site. 

I return again today with part two of our series on individual workflow when working with Fujifilm X Series cameras and lenses. When it comes to photography, and in particular our individual workflow, we all have capacity and limitations. Workflow can mean many things.  We discovered in part one of this series, which you can check out here, that members of our community have different approaches to their workflow especially as a direct result of the type of work they are doing.  In that blog, Rena, Roger and Natalia all shared their workflow practices. 

Today, we get to hear from Eko Julianto and Bhagi Siva about what workflow means to them and how they go about their craft.  

Bhagi Siva

Could you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? How long have you been doing photography? Is photography a full time job, part time or a hobby for you?

Hi I’m Bhagi Siva and I would call myself a travel and documentary photographer. Here and there I do some documentary styled fashion shoots. It’s just out of curiosity to blend different genres. I was born in Sri Lanka and permanently migrated to Australia a few years back and I am currently working as a Doctor. Photography rarely ever put food on my plate, however it always feeds my soul to the fullest. That is the reason why I am pursuing it for almost a decade now. It is that search for the meaningful picture, of a fraction of the past this beautiful world goes through, and the unexpected drama of moments that happens out of nowhere. This makes me addicted to this craft for all this time.

Workflow can incorporate so many things. So lets start with the basics. What Fujifilm X System camera is your go-to every-day carry?

I have a Fujifilm X-T2 with a few primes and zoom lens. If I had to pick only one pair then I would choose Fujifilm X-T2 with Fujifilm XF23mmF1.4. During my travels I used to carry 2 or 3 bodies which are generously loaned by Fujifilm Australia and most of the lenses covering from 10mm to 200mm. During my last trip to Vietnam I carried a Fujifilm X100F which is an amazing piece of gear and probably the only camera to carry if you had only one choice. We always pick a camera to go out and shoot, but if we ever go out to shoot because we got that special camera, without doubt it would be something from Fujifilm X100 series.

So with that Fujifilm X Series camera you have dual SD slots. How do you manage that capability?

Fujifilm X-T2 has dual SD slots. In the past I have missed few amazing moments due to suddenly running out of storage when continuously shooting at one location. Dual slots are one of the key deciding factors in choosing the Fujifilm X-T2.  I use the second slot for the uninterrupted shooting thus minimising the risk of missing great unpredictable moments which are most common with travel and street photography. As I used to travel mostly in the remote parts of the countries I visit I do not use the second SD cards as a backup as its hard to find a decent place to transfer the photos from the memory cards and I will need lots of cards. (I do not carry a laptop and I am not a fan of memory cards with more than 32GB capacity). If I ever shoot a video then I save it in the second card slot where I would have a card with higher write speed.

Do you shoot in JPEG or RAW or both? Does this ever change and if so for what reasons?

Fujifilm image files do not need much processing. They have amazing contrast and the colour profiles are something I cannot live without. However like any other cameras in the market they are not 100% perfect. It is a relative term, in relative to dynamic range of our eyes and what the real essence of a scene is. RAW files are helpful in such a way to make the images closely resemble the actual scene. So I do basic processing of almost all the images I post . Only time I use jpegs is if it’s a small family event for easy transfer of the files among the people who attended.

When it comes to post processing your images, do you use your mobile device, tablet or a computer to edit? And based on that, what is your preferred software to edit images?

For the proper editing I use the desktop computer almost exclusively. Since I used to have early start and late finish of most of my photo tours I don’t find enough time to edit images on the go. The technology is advancing and handheld devices can be used as powerful hardware to edit the image and from my limited experience I am really satisfied with the ease of post processing and output from mobile devices. If I’m using a mobile software then it would be Snapseed. 99% of my workflow involves Lightroom. Most of the landscapes end-up in Adobe photoshop just for spot removal for which Photoshop does a tremendous job while Lightroom still need some improvements.

Out of interest, do you ever export images to the Fujifilm Remote Camera App and if so when would you use this?

Yes, I use it all the time when I am traveling in-between locations or at the hotel to transfer the selected images to mobile for a quick edit to update the social networks. Recently I was on a road trip to the North coast of NSW and the remote shooting was very handy in taking a picture of myself incorporated into a landscape scene.

What sort of storage solutions do you employ for your images once you have completed the editing process? How do you back-up your work – cloud, hard drives, website based?

Storage is every photographers nightmare. The hard work of digital photographers lies on the hands of these storage mediums. I use hard drives to save the edited and RAW images and have another copy of the same in another hard disk. Also I save my edited images to my websites in smugmug and squarespace with unlimited storage capacity.

If people wanted to view your work online where can they find you?

Yep I got few social media site as follows,

Website+Blog – www.bhagisiva.com

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/bhagi_siva/

Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/Bhagisivaphotography/

Screen Shot 2018-08-05 at 9.16.57 am

Eko Julianto

Could you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Is photography a full time job, part time or a hobby for you?

I am Chinese from Indonesia. Lived in various towns like Malang, Tegal, Jakarta and moved to Singapore when I was 7 years old. I then moved to Melbourne in 1994 and got a design degree at Monash University. I am working professionally as a building designer and building estimator. Photography is a way for me to relax and document my life. I’m fortunate enough that this hobby of mine gets me the odd photography gigs.

Workflow can incorporate so many things. So lets start with the basics. What Fujifilm X System camera is your go-to every-day carry?

My Nikon camera system gear is basically my workhorse and I still keep the old film cameras. My Fujifilm camera system are for me to have fun with. I’m attracted to Fujifilm camera system since the first generation x100 because of its simplicity, dials, so I can concentrate more on making photographs than going through camera menus. I own all X100 series cameras and am thinking of getting that brown X100F although I have the black version (got GAS). I also have the X-Pro1 and X-Pro2 so I can use still use my old Olympus and Nikkor legendary lenses with converters.

I don’t own any Fujifilm XT series or XH series cause I hate hiding behind the camera. I love this camera (X100F) because of the position of the viewfinder. I want to make sure that people can see my smiling face when I photograph them. Whenever I travel to a big major city, I would carry my black X100F and maybe both tele and wide angle lens attachments just in case. If its for my own personal work, I uses dual memory slot as over-flow. Usually shot in jpeg.  If it is a paid gig, I uses both slot as back-up. One is Jpeg and one is Raw for heavy processing. I like the versatility of the 2 slots.

When it comes to post processing your images, do you use your mobile device, tablet or a computer to edit? And based on that, what is your preferred software to edit images?

Depending on what I’m photographing, the post processing methods varies from one to another. If its personal photography work, I don’t normally limit myself to anything. Sometimes straight out of the camera through the Fujifilm Remote Camera App to ipad or phone to social media. If it is a paid gig, I uses Photoshop and Camera Raw – usually accompanied by a bottle of wine listening to music. I do believe that if we don’t get a photograph, no matter how cool your post processing skill is, the result doesn’t matter. So I do make an effort to get exposure right in the camera.

What sort of storage solutions do you employ for your images once you have completed the editing process?

I put my photographs in a folder sorted by year and month. Normally keep them in my laptop for a few month before storing them in my external hard drives.

If people wanted to view your work online where can they find you?

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/eko.julianto/

Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ekjulianto

DSCF8409_1
Before – Fujifilm X-Pro2 XF90mmF2
DSCF8409
After – Fujifilm X-Pro2 XF90mmF2

So once again a small but interesting sample of how people manage their workflow. Also interesting to get to know a little more about our members from a personal point of view. As we discussed in the last blog about workflow, it is really about making the most of what you have and understanding the options you have available to you. If you cannot afford a computer or a Lightroom account, then just use the Fujifilm Remote App to download your JPEGs straight from camera to your phone. There are lots of free editing Apps on phones now so make the most of those. There is no need to overcomplicate your experience especially when you are doing something that you love. I want to thank Bhagi and Eko for their contribution to this blog. Happy shooting. 

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